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Everything you always wanted to know about your pets but didn't know who to ask.

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A VERY TOUGH DECISION

 

     In addition to Nose-To-Toes.com, Nose-To-Toes has also been available in print form for the past 20 years.

     After much soul-searching, we have reluctantly come to the decision to put the printing of Nose-To-Toes on hiatus for a while. Our website NoseToToes.com will continue to be available each month which allows us to continue to present new and exciting features with informative and timely articles for your reading pleasure.

     We have thoroughly appreciated the opportunity to deliver Nose-To-Toes to our devoted veterinary network and our wonderful readers for 20 amazing years. 

     We appreciate your dedication, your letters and emails and phone calls, and your enthusiasm for Nose-To-Toes.

     We are so grateful for the interest you have shown in Nose-To-Toes, and we look forward to returning to offering our print publication soon. In the meantime, please visit our website at Nose-To-Toes.com.

     If you would like to contact us, please do not hesitate to do so.  We can be reached by email at NoseToToes@hotmail.com

     Or by mail at: Nose-To-Toes  *  P.O. Box 2029  *  Lynnwood, WA 98036

 

 

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TOP 10 QUESTIONS – ANSWERS

 

     Each month we are answering the most often researched questions on Google in 2014 about dogs and cats. Last month, we addressed the 9th most researched questions: How to introduce dogs, and Why do cats like boxes.

         This month, we look at the eighth most frequently asked questions: about dogs, How to stop dogs from digging, and about cats, Why do cats eat grass.

     Dogs dig; it’s a fact. So, how do dog owners teach their canines not to dig up the garden or the lawn, or any other area. Some experts recommend putting items that repel dogs in the areas where they tend to dig to repel the dog (orange peels, garlic, cabbage). However, this practice may create other problems by attracting rodents and other animals.

     Dog owners have reported great success at teaching dogs not to dig by spending time with them when they are outdoors, interrupting the digging activity, and redirecting their attention to something else, like playing with a frisbee or a ball or some other toy. This becomes a reward for not digging and the positive reinforcement that all animals thrive on.

     The feline question was Why do cats eat grass.

     Actually, both dog and cats enjoy this natural treat. They prefer the sweetest, greenest, and most tender blades of grass to nibble on. Some experts believe they are seeking folic acid, a type of vitamin found in grasses and other foliage, that cats (and dogs) seek to cure an upset stomach by eating the grass which may cause them to vomit afterwards, or that they are adding roughage to their diet. The basic thought is simply that the sweet grass tastes good.

     Next month, we answer the seventh most often searched questions. For dogs, the question was, Why are dogs’ noses wet, and for cats, it was Why do cats hate water.

     If you would like to share your thoughts with us so we can share them with all of our readers, please email your answers to us at: NoseToToes@hotmail.com, or mail your answers to:

Nose-To-Toes Top 10

P.O. Box 2029

Lynnwood, WA 98036

 

Click here to check some of the answers we have received from our readers

 

 

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IF YOU LIVED LIKE A DOG

 

     What would humans learn if dogs were teachers:

• When loved ones come home, always run to greet them.

• Allow the experience of fresh air and the wind in your face to be pure ecstasy.

• Take naps

• Run, romp, and play daily.

• Avoid biting when a simple growl will do.

• On warm days, stop to lie on your back on the grass.

• On hot days, drink lots of water and lie under a shady tree.

• No matter how often you're scolded, don't pout. Run right back and make friends.

• Delight in the simple joy of a long walk.

• Be loyal. Never pretend to be something you're not.

• When someone is having a bad day, sit close by, nuzzle gently.

• When you're happy, dance around and wag your entire body.

 

 

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¡QUE BONITO!

 

     History tells about the Spanish who discovered and conquered the Canary Islands near the end of the 15th Century. But rarely will you read about the birds found native to the area.

     The original canaries found by the Spaniards were yellow. Color mutations didn't begin until the 17th Century when the yellow-checkered strain was established. The latest color mutation, red, dates back only to the beginning of this century.

     The goal in breeding was specific colorations and other physical characteristics. Frilled canaries with their curly feathers were developed early.

     Canaries with hooded heads, feather ruffs, and elongated bodies were also developed early but are practically unknown today.

     Modern breeders focus primarily on the bird's coloration and his singing ability.

 

 

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FASCINATING

 

     One of the oldest purebred donkeys in the world today is the Baudet du Poitou, or Poitou Donkey. They have been around for centuries but almost became extinct after World War II when transportation transferred from donkeys to automobiles.

     By 1977, there were only 44 Baudet du Poitou alive. After an aggressive effort to replenish the breed by an organization called SABAUD (Association to Save the Baudet du Poitou), their numbers are up to about 400 worldwide.

     These are one of the most unique donkeys with some very interesting characteristics. They are best known for a long tangled coat, called a cadenette. Hooves of a purebred Poitou Donkey are much larger and more open than another donkey breed of comparable size.

     Speaking of size, these are big animals. In France, they are described as I’áne de grande espèce, or the bog species of donkey. And it is a fact. These donkeys stand up to 15.2 hands high (one hand = 4”).

 

 

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MOTHER’S DAY

 

     We celebrate moms, human as well as animal, year ‘round, and appreciate everything they do for us, for their love and for their attention. The “official” day of celebration is Mother’s Day, this year on Sunday, May 10th. What a great opportunity to say thank you to all moms! From all of us at Nose-To-Toes, a very special Happy Mother’s Day!

 

 

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MONKEY NOTES

 

     There are 133 different kinds of monkeys in the world. The Owl Monkey has unique facial features: those of an owl, with especially large eyes. This breed is the only nocturnal monkey in the world.

 

 

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DOG BITE DETAILS

 

     May 17-23 is National Dog Bite Prevention Week. The American Veterinary Medical Association has designated this week as a time to educate dog owners and non-owners alike on how to avoid aggressive dog situations and dog bites. 

     Each year up to one-million people require medical treatment for dog bites, and millions more bites go unreported. Dog bites are the number one public health problem of children.

     Any type, size, or age of dog can bite. There are several steps dog owners can take to work with their dog and help avoid biting situations, regardless of the environment:

* Socialize your pet. The more comfortable he feels around people and other animals, the less stressed he will become.

* Train your dog to understand and obey the basic commands. “Sit,” “Stay,” and “No” will help you control his actions.

* Don’t allow your dog to be teased or taunted. Aggression often occurs when animals are harassed.

* Obey leash laws. In addition to potential fines for unleashed pets, dogs roaming freely are obviously not easily controlled.

* Keep your dog healthy, fleas under control, and vaccinations up-to-date. Dogs may become agitated when they are ill, and certainly are stressed when fleas take over.

 

 

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YEAR ‘ROUND WARMTH

 

     Big is an understatement when it comes to describing Polar Bears.

     Males are up to three times larger than females, some weighing up to 1,400 pounds and measuring about 10 feet long. Females are just 300-550 pounds and relatively short at about eight feet.

     Interestingly, these bears have the same body temperature as humans at 98.6º. Although people would quickly perish in the arctic cold, polar bears easily survive. Their skin is black, allowing the animal to absorb a great deal of heat from the sun. Also, their fur and thick blubber create an effective insulation to help the bear from getting cold.

     There are as many as 28,000 polar bears worldwide, about as many males as there are females.

 

 

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FISH FACTS

 

* Baby whales gain as much as seven pounds a day.

* There is an eel-like fish that is about 25-feet long and up to a foot wide. Called the longest bony fish in the sea, the Oarfish can weigh up to 600-pounds. The Oarfish lives in the deep waters of the world’s oceans so he is rarely seen.

* Fish often can get seasick, especially if exposed to constant “storm waves.”

 

 

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DERBY ATHLETES

 

     The Kentucky Derby is on the first Saturday of May each year. In addition to all the pomp and circumstance of this leg of the Triple Crown, this race is an opportunity to see some of the best equine athletes in action.

     Straight ahead, over a long distance, the horse is very fast. But throw in a sudden stop or a sharp turn, and the equine has some major work to do.

     Starting and stopping on a dime is not in the horse’s repertoire.

     Horses are not necessarily fast “out of the gate” but will gather speed as they run the distance.

     Thoroughbreds can accelerate to more than 50 miles an hour in as little as 7-seconds.

     The size of the horse is one of the biggest barriers to his ability to accelerate quickly as he battles the basic Law of Inertia.

     In the Nose-To-Toes physics class, we know that it takes a lot of effort to get a stationary object moving. We also know that once moving, it takes extra effort to stop that momentum.

     Horses have no “stopping muscles” at all. In order to put on the brakes, the horse must use the propulsion muscles of his hindquarters to stop by letting those heavy muscles oppose, rather than generate, the motion.

     Translation: Horses use the accelerator muscles backward to slow down their speed.

 

 

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LET’S FLY

 

     Animals have taken over the month of May. There are a variety of commemorative dates set for this month, including International Migratory Bird Day on May 9th.

     Nearly 350 species of birds migrate from South and Central America to North America every year. Their travel has been well documented by the Audubon Society as well as amateur observers.

 

 

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FAMILY FUN

 

     Camping ... backpacking ... hiking ... Regardless of the activity, each can be a lot of fun, great exercise, and a bonding experience. Bring your favorite canine along and the whole event is raised to another level.

     In addition to companionship, your dog may help you discover new sights. Always keep him on a leash when hiking or backpacking.

     As he leads you, he will naturally explore unfamiliar sights and smells. His attention to those areas will pique your interest also, allowing you to discover otherwise unnoticed scenery.

     Prepare your human and canine family for the outing.

     Licenses must be current.

     Check with your veterinarian to confirm that your pet is in good health and that these outings won’t be too strenuous for him.

     If your canine needs medication or special food, be sure to bring them with you. Also, be sure to check with your vet to make sure all of your dog’s vaccinations are up-to-date.

 

 

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ANIMAL SOUNDS

 

     Animals communicate with sounds that range from barks to whistles, chirps to grunts, and meows to screams.

     Interestingly, the sounds made by very different animals have been given the same name to describe their communication, despite the diversity of the animals themselves:

‹› Dogs and Frogs bark 

‹› Magpies and Monkeys chatter

‹› Calves, Giraffes, Penguins, and Sheep bleat

‹› Sparrows and Grasshoppers chirp

‹› Ravens and Frogs croak

‹› Loons and Wolves howl

‹› Tortoises and Pugs grunt

 

 

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STATES HONOR

 

     White-Tailed Deer are graceful animals who live in a variety of regions throughout the U.S.

     They are easily identified by their large, distinctive ears; long legs; narrow, pointed hooves; and their distinctively colored tail which is brown on top and white underneath. When alarmed, the white-tailed deer raises his tail high as he flees the perceived danger.

     Those hoofed feet and long legs contribute to the animal’s athleticism. These deer are able to jump over nine foot fences. They can swim up to 13 miles an hour. And when frightened, they can run as fast as 40 miles an hour.

     Deer are herbivores. They graze on leaves, berries, grasses, nuts, fruits, and corn.

     These animals are so recognized in the U.S. that seven states have honored them by naming this species their “official state animal”: Illinois, Michigan, Nebraska, Ohio, South Carolina, Wisconsin, and Pennsylvania.

 

 

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MIRROR, MIRROR ON THE WALL

 

     When cats see their reflection in a mirror they try to touch it with a paw, or even hiss at it and seem to be fooled into thinking it’s another cat. What excites the cat about his reflection is the motion he sees. Each time the cat moves, so does the reflection. (What matters most is how you see yourself.)

 

 

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HONORING TURTLES

 

     The earliest sea turtle fossils have been documented at about 150-million years old.

     These air-breathing animals once filled the world’s oceans, but recently their population has dwindled to the point that many species are being wiped out.

     May 23rd has been designated Sea Turtle Day in an effort to educate people about these animals and their plight.

 

 

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TOO LONELY

 

     Never leave dogs alone in the yard while you are vacationing.  

     Dogs are pack animals and need companionship. They get frustrated at being left alone, they may chew and damage outdoor furniture, etc., and regardless of the quality of fence you have, they can dig out of your yard.

     You wouldn’t leave your children alone for extended periods, don’t leave your dogs alone either!

     If pet sitting is not your best solution, check out the many quality kennels available. Many veterinary clinics will also board animals.

 

 

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PHOTO MAGIC

 

     Taking pictures of pets is a favorite hobby of most pet owners. In fact, surveys show that 69% of animal households have at least one photo of their pet on display. Many people also carry pictures of their favorite pet in their wallets. 

     Experts offer three tips to taking great photos:

     1.  Be ready. Most of your animal’s antics are spontaneous, and that is often when he or she is the cutest. Have a camera handy. Even disposable cameras take adequate photos so having more than one in your home is not a bad idea.

     2.  Get down. Everyone has seen pictures of animals where they are looking almost straight up at the camera. It is not a natural pose or even their natural personality. Get down to the level of your pet, eye-to-eye. It is a unique perspective for the camera lens and creates some fascinating photos.

     3.  Practice patience. Animals, like children, will rarely stay in one position for any length of time. They are typically perpetual motion, so you have to be willing to wait for the pose, activity, or action you are looking for.  An animal’s spontaneous actions also make great pictures.  The secret to successful pet photos:

     Keep the camera handy and waiting for that perfect shot.

 

 

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BIG CHANGES

 

     There are more than 200 official breeds of horses and ponies worldwide.

     Dating back some 65-million years, horses were initially small, deer-like animals called Hyracotherium.

     Although most horses have evolved a great deal from that prehistoric time, Przewalski’s Horse, also known as the Asiatic Wild Horse, is a rare and endangered subspecies of the wild horse.

     These horses were discovered in Mongolia in 1881 and have changed very little from their ancestors.

 

 

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TICKLE TIME

 

     All bird feathers fall into three main categories:

     • Contour Feathers coat the body, giving the birds their streamlined shape.

     • Soft Down Feathers lie below the contour feathers and are also used for insulation.

     • Flight Feathers are long, stiff quills are found on the wings and tail of birds.

 

 

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BIGGEST FISH

 

     The Beluga, or Russian Sturgeon, is the largest freshwater fish in the world, averaging 12 feet long and 1,600 pounds.

 

 

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SLEEK DOG, GREAT PET

 

     Grace, speed, and stamina, with a name that can be hard to pronounce. The Weimaraner (WHY-muhr-ann-er) breed began in Weimar, Germany in the early 19th Century. These canines were originally raised as hunting dogs. However through time, they have also evolved into great family pets.

     Weimaraners measure up to 27” and weigh as much as 85 pounds. They require room to run, time for exercise, and space to thrive. They are not happy if required to spend their time in a kennel.

     Their courage and scenting abilities make them valuable as hunting companions as well as guardians and watchdogs. These canines demonstrate tremendous intelligence. It is also important to recognize their strength and that obedience training is a must.

     Most dogs respond best to positive reinforcement training. This is especially true with the Weimaraner.

 

 

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BUNNY NIBBLES

 

     Rabbits are great little pets and fascinating as they grow and develop. They are born blind, deaf, and completely naked, and need the protection of their mother and the nest.

     During the 7th to 11th day, the baby rabbits open their eyes. They grow some soft, downy fur that gives a first hint of the later coat and its marking.

     Bunnies begin to climb out of the nest during their second week. The fur is growing thick and fluffy. They begin making their first attempts at grooming.

     In their third week, they are learning to stand on their hind legs without falling over.

     By the fourth and fifth weeks, they have learned to hop and have begun to eat grain as they are slowly adding solid food to their diet.

     From the sixth week on, the bunnies have completely adjusted to solid food.

     The young rabbits are big enough by the eighth week to move to a new home. The exception is the Angora. They should not be separated from their mother until they are about 12 weeks old.

 

 

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LOTS OF WORK

 

     There are about 40,000-75,000 bees in the average honey a bee colony. These insects really put in a lot of work. It takes about 80,000 trips between flower and hive to make just a single pound of honey.

 

 

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TOUCHY TOES

 

     As the weather turns warmer and outdoor activities increase, it is important to remember canine sensitivities, especially their footpads.

     Hot pavement can work like a blast furnace.

     Walk your dog in the morning or evening when the ground is not as hot. Carry your small dog over hot pavement to a grassy area. Walking over coarse gravel or on a running track can also damage footpads.

 

 

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HIRED TO EAT - WHAT A CONCEPT!

 

     The Federal Bureau of Reclamation used an innovative technique for vegetation control on Tiger Island in California, using about 1,600 goats on the project to clear the area so authorities could inspect it for a variety of defects. This was the most environmentally friendly method for clearing the land.

     The goats did not belong to the Bureau. They were eating on independent contractor status, rented from a local farmer.

     Let’s do a little math: There are 5.8 acres per mile. It is a 26-mile levee. The 1,600 goats munched an average of about 1½ acres each day. It took these goats about 100 days to clear the levee!

     California is not the only state to use goat-power. They have been used in Washington, Idaho, Oregon ... in fact 39 of the 50 states have reported success with this eco-friendly ground-clearing.

     Goats have been used to clear blackberries and overgrowth for generations. Before chemicals were developed to clear weeds and other unwanted vegetation, pulling and digging were the most often methods until the voracious appetite of the goats was found to be less work for humans and much more effective.

 

 

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READER ANSWERS TO GOOGLE QUESTIONS

 

     Each month we are sharing each of the Top 10 cat and dog questions Google identified as most frequently asked in 2014 along with our Nose-To-Toes answers. We invite our readers to share their answers as well.

     #8 dog question: How to stop dogs from digging

     Leah and Angel at Mountain View Pet Clinic shared their answer: Stop a dog from digging by first getting a professional to trim those nails and then keeping them so busy with other activities that they are too tired to dig.

    Marilyn from Tampa, Florida wrote: I have a lot of luck by training my dog to dig in one area that is his, for his specific use.  

     #8 cat question: Why do cats eat grass

     Leah and Angel at Mountain View Pet Clinic suggested: Cats eat grass to help them vomit if their stomach is upset    

     From Marilyn in Tampa, Florida: If the grass if new growth, I think it just tastes good to the cats, like lettuce for humans.

     We welcome your answers to these questions and look forward to sharing them with our readers.  Each of the Top 10 Dog and Cat questions were listed on page 8 of the February 2015 issue of Nose-To-Toes. 

     Please send your answers to:  Nose-To-Toes  -  P.O. Box 2029  -  Lynnwood, WA 98036

Or email us at:       NoseToToes@hotmail.com

 

 

     Click here for the Nose-To-Toes answers to the #8 questions

 

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PUPPY PAUSE

 

     Hairy Notes: A dog’s coat grows in bundles; humans grow solitary hairs. The growth cycle for a dog’s fur is cyclic; human hair growth is continual.

     Basenji is known as the “dog that can’t quite bark.

     Poodles are considered the brightest breed.

     Dalmatians are believed to have the best memories in the canine world.

 

 

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KITTY I.Q.

 

     Most cat owners are already convinced that their cats are smart. It’s the non-feline humans who need proof. In general, cats have an I.Q. far superior to that of dogs. The only animals allegedly smarter than cats are monkeys and chimps.

 

 

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PIGEON FACTS

 

• Most domesticated pigeons have a common ancestor, the Rock Dove pigeon.

Racing Homing Pigeons have been clocked flying 92.5 mph average speed on a 400 mile race.

• When the pigeon is in long flight, it reaches back and holds on to the short tail feathers with its feet in order to save energy from holding its legs up.

 

 

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BELIEVE IT OR NOT

 

     Unique characteristics of the animal world create fascinating tidbits of information:     

          ** White Shark - Teeth as hard as steel.

          ** Chameleon - Tongue is as long as the body.

          ** Pelicans - Have no nostrils.

          ** Gila Monster - Can live off fat stored in its tail.

          ** Cockroach - Has not changed for 275 million years.

          ** Komodo Dragon - Teeth as sharp as a shark’s.

          ** Flea - Its armor is tougher than an M-1 tank.

 

 

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BIG BLUE

 

     Aquariums are a study in diversity and always a challenge as you find a unique fish to add to enhance the watery world.

     If color is important, consider the Real Tang. Found in the Indo-Pacific, this species has been called the bluest thing on Earth. It has a deep blue body and a bright yellow tail. This is a peaceful species but they will fight among themselves so it is wise not to keep them with other Real Tangs.

 

 

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DID YOU KNOW

 

     Puppies are born without teeth. But never fear, those pearly whites grow quickly. Between three and six weeks of age, dogs have 28 baby teeth. By four months, their permanent adult teeth appear. The 42 permanent teeth fully replace the baby teeth by about seven months.

 

 

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EQUINE TIDBITS

 

     Interest in horses usually increases with the running of the Triple Crown. As the Kentucky Derby opens this summer’s events (followed by the Preakness then the Belmont Stakes), thoroughbreds are often the focus of particular attention by experts and novices alike.

     This breed evolved in England from about 1700-1900.

     The thoroughbred is one of over 350 different breeds of horses and ponies, divided into four main categories, light, heavy or draft horses, ponies, and feral.

     “Light" horses weigh less than 1,300 pounds. They have small bones and thin legs. This group includes Thoroughbreds.

     "Heavy" or “draft” horses are especially strong, weighing up to 2,000 pounds. The famous Clydesdale is a representative of this group.

     “Ponies” are usually less than 14.2 hands high (58 inches).

     “Feral” horses are classified as semi-wild or wild horses.

 

 

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RED PANDAS

 

     Also called Fire Fox and Himalayan Raccoon, the Red Panda is native to the eastern Himalayas. Their striped tail gives them the foxlike appearance, but their head and ears put them squarely in the bear category.

     Their bushy tails are used to help them balance in trees, an especially helpful trait as they climb to savor their favorite meal, bamboo. That tail is also helpful as a blanket to keep the animal warm in the colder months.

     Red Pandas are slightly larger than most domestic cats. They measure 30-48 inches from tip of the nose to the tip of the tail, and about one half of that length is their tail.

 

 

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TOXIC SPRING FLOWERS

 

     April showers bring May flowers. We have had the April showers, now it is time to enjoy the May flowers. However, not all flowers are safe for animal family members. Most cats (and many dogs) like to munch on plants. Many of those plants are toxic to the animals and should not be included in landscape, or at the very least, be kept in an area that is unavailable to pets.

     Over 200 plants are potentially toxic to animals. Poisonous plants range from Achira to the African Violet, Holly to Orchid, and Zebra Plant to Zinnia. Not every part of the plant may be toxic, but rather only the leaves or the stem or the berries may make your pet sick.

     There are many guidelines in determining which may be toxic plants. Most experts agree that any plant with milky or colored sap is almost certainly toxic. Although there is no list of absolutely safe plants, some are fine for munching by most animals. For instance, grass, untreated by chemicals, is always a favorite.

 

 

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BEAUTIFUL BUTTERFLIES

 

     Butterflies live about one year in the tropics. In more temperate climates, they can live from a few weeks to a few months, some for just a few hours.

     Most are very colorful, with patterns and colors covering almost every possibility. Males usually display the most color. As with the legend of snowflakes, no two butterflies of the same species are exactly alike.

 

 

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DO YOU AGREE?

 

     “Dog barking is a pointless, energy-wasting activity.” That is the conclusion of Hampshire College biologist Raymond Coppinger. He has spent 30 years studying dogs and their barking habits. He concluded that “unlike other wild animal calls, the dog’s bark has no built-in biological message.”

     Coppinger determined that dogs averaged 907 barks in a 10-minute period. When multiplied by the over 52-million dogs in the U.S., that’s a lot of barking!    

     He believes that “there is an evolutionary quirk that has left the domesticated dog in a state of permanent adolescence. Dogs bark for the same reason that teenagers hang out in the shopping malls: that’s what adolescents do.”

     Despite these conclusions, dog lovers agree: If your dog barks less than 900 times in 10 minutes, be happy. If he barks only occasionally, be thrilled. If a dog is part of your family, regardless of how much he barks, what a lucky household!

 

 

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AMERICA’S FORGOTTEN HEROES

 

     Memorial Day is May 25th this year. Dogs have had an important role in most conflicts throughout the world since World War I.

     Just after the 1918 armistice, the Hartsdale (NY) Pet Cemetery became the site for a war dog monument described as topped with a bronze statue of a shepherd dog wearing a Red Cross blanket. At the shepherd’s feet are a bronze helmet and a canteen. Many other memorials have been dedicated since that first site. As of today, there are at least 18 states that honor war dogs with a variety of memorials.

     Military canines undergo extensive basic training. They participate in specialized training, including scout or patrol dogs, messenger dogs, and mine dogs. The vast majority is trained to be sentry dogs.

     In fact, of the 10,425 trained, 9,300 were used for sentry duty.

 

 

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AVIARY EXTRAS

 

     No matter how small your pet birds are, choose the largest cage you can. The most important measurement of the ideal cage should be the length since birds need space to fly.

     Cages with vertical bars are fine for Canaries and Finches.

     The Hookbill enjoys climbing. The best cage design for these birds should be horizontal bars.

     Toys, bells, and swings are added comforts for your birds’ cage. Important necessities are perches of varying lengths and thicknesses, and bowls for baths.

     Birds like an occasional splash. Most birds love water; many will whistle and sing as they bathe.

 

 

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WET PET HOME

 

     Aquariums are a peaceful addition to most homes. Most people begin with a 10-20 gallon aquarium. Experts believe that a 20-gallon tank is actually less work than 10-gallons.

     To keep fish healthy, water quality must be monitored. The water in small tanks tends to change more quickly, creating more work. The larger tank volumes change more slowly and can be easily adjusted.

     Goldfish can thrive in relatively cool water, cooler than tropical fish. The selection of which species of fish to add is important so that all are compatible to the water temperature and to each other.

 

 

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MORE THAN PETS

 

     Cats come in all sizes, colors, and personalities. They also come in 37 different species. Seven of the species are classified as big cats: lions, tigers, leopards, jaguars, snow leopards, clouded leopards, and cheetahs. The 30 remaining species are referred to as small cats.

     The smallest of the big cats is the Black- Footed Cat of Africa, weighing just four pounds. The largest is the Siberian Tiger which can weigh up to 800 lbs.

     The range of sizes of the small cat species is not nearly as wide.

     The smallest breed is the Singapura at about 5 pounds.

     The largest are the Maine Coon and Ragdoll breeds, which can weigh 20 pounds. The average domestic cat weight is 11 pounds.

 

 

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Nose-To-Toes is a monthly publication and website distributed by Melody Tucker, MTA, P.O. Box 2029, Lynnwood, WA 98036.  Nose-To-Toes is a registered trademark of MTA.  As a new/information newsletter and website, data is gathered from published reports and documents, and advertisements are received from sponsoring companies, and the inclusion of product, service, or treatment information does not constitute an endorsement, and in no way is intended as a substitute or medical counseling.  Nose-To-Toes strives for accuracy in its articles and honesty in its advertisements, but the publisher and editor assume no responsibility for injuries or loss incurred by anyone utilizing the information in the articles or responding to the ads.  Nothing may be reproduced in whole or in part without written permission from MTA.

 

© 2015 Melody Tucker & Associates

P.O. Box 2029, Lynnwood, WA  98036

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